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Call For Participation

We are pleased to announce the 8th Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning, to take place from Monday, May 21th to Friday May 25th, 2012 in Estoril, Portugal. Pre-summer school activities are organized all day on Sunday, May 20th.

The summer school aims to encourage participants to adopt a critical stance in thinking about the role of technologies in providing opportunities for learners and the potential of these opportunities in terms of learning.

The summer school provides a learning environment where participants get opportunities to: develop their research skills; increase their knowledge base; collaborate with others in their own and complementary research areas; engage in debate; have access to experts in the field; and discuss their own work.

The programme will include lectures from a broad range of domains which contribute to advancing the field of Technology Enhanced Learning. TEL research projects are encouraged to provide students with a perspective of the state-of-the-art research under study in their working groups. The programme will also include practical and methodological workshops and opportunities for doctoral candidates to develop their personal research. Students will have opportunities to present and discuss their doctoral work.

Applicants requiring financial support for participation or travel should explicitly mention it in their motivation letter, briefly explaining their circumstances. It is expected that applicants working on research projects which are able to fund them will not apply for financial support. To ensure a high ratio between tutors and students the school will be limited to 60 PhD students.

In order to increase social contacts among the summer school participants, the programme includes several social events. A variety of sport activities will also be offered to the summer school participants. Cultural excursions are organised on the Sunday preceding the summer school and the Saturday which closes the summer school.

Applications

Applications for participation, workshop and lecture proposals should be submitted online before Thursday, March 1st, 2012. Please download the application form.

Important dates


March 1st, 2012: Deadline for submitting applications, workshop and lecture proposals to the Summer School

April 1st, 2012: Notification of acceptance

April 20th, 2012:Registration

May 1st, 2012: Pre-Summer School videoconferences begin

May 21, 2012: Summer School begins

Support


STELLAR Network of Excellence    EA-TEL                                   

Schedule

Please note this schedule is preliminary and subject to changes

Color key

LecturesWorkshopsCoffee/FoodLeisureExcursions

Saturday, May 19   

19:30-20:30
Registration
20:30-22:00
Dinner

Sunday, May 20   

09:00-20:00
EXCURSION - Sintra, Cabo da Roca: Meeting at 09:00 in the Hotel Vila Galé Lobby
20:30-22:00
Dinner
22:00-24:00
Welcome party

Monday, May 21   

08:30-09:00
Registration
09:00-10:30
Welcome Session
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
11:00-12:30
Plenary — Lecture Hall
Pecha-Kucha

What is this, you might ask. It is a way to present yourself, your work, your interests, your hobbies in short an compact way.

  • everybody has to provide FOUR slides
  • all presentations will be put together into one big presentation
  • every slide will be shown for 20 or 30 seconds
  • changes between slides are automated
  • there will be a slide with the name of the person to present next visible for five seconds (presentations will be ordered alphabetically by surname)
  • when it's your turn, walk up to the front and present
  • you will not be able to use your own computer for this. Nor will you be able to change the slides by yourself

What shall the slides be about? Well, basically anything that helps the others to better get to know you and your work. The slides can be about yourself, your bio, your hobbies/activities, your interests, your slogan for life, your motto, your research in a nutshell, your take-home message, ... They can contain text and/or pictures but no videos and no animations (all interactive elements will be removed). An example can be looked at here: http://www.slideshare.net/jtelss10/jtel-summer-school2010-pechakucha-session

Please email your presentation of these four slides to me (maren.scheffel@fit.fraunhofer.de) by 18:00 CEST on Friday, May 18.

12:30-14:00
Lunch
14:00-15:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Ph.D. Methodology, Procedures and BehaviourMeeting specific needs at JTEL Summer School, this workshop intends to answer to some of the demands from previous summer schools in which students pointed out the need to understand general procedures of:
  • Writing a thesis related to TEL;
  • Timing and constraints to finish their Ph.D;
  • How to proceed with “the writing and the requisites” after finishing investigating;
  • What students need to do in order to conclude their Ph.D;
  • What is the correct way to react, if things run differently from what was planned.
It is then pertinent to provide them with a short, but necessary, guideline about this and other questions that might intrigue them. At the end of this workshop the student will have a clear idea of different facts about the procedure to conclude a Ph.D. work, also some timing schedule and a preliminary proposition of the index of their own thesis.
(Porta, Loureiro)
Parallel Workshop 2
TEL-MOOC: large-scale online course on TELMOOCs (massive open online courses) are talked of everywhere at the moment. The European Association of Technology Enhanced Learning (EA-TEL) plans to run a MOOC on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL-MOOC) in the autumn of 2012. Within the workshop we will
  • introduce the concept of MOOCs,
  • brainstorm about interesting topics, speakers and technology to be used for the TEL-MOOC,
  • discuss (social) media coverage and automatic analyses of the course,
  • research potentials that arise from the course (maybe some PhD student would like to study the TEL-MOOC),
  • perform a SWOT analysis of a TEL-MOOC,
  • discuss and define formal criteria for accreditation of a TEL-MOOC in the local PhD programs of the participants.
(Reinhard)
Parallel Workshop 3
Basics of Game Design

The workshop aims to build an understanding of the basic concepts in game design. Identifies some terminology to comprehend different elements involved in game development.

Nowadays we utilize the term Serious Games for making reference to games that target learning aspects within digital gaming. Nevertheless, as Obliger mentions: ”[m]ost educators are neither game players nor game developers” (Oblinger, 2006). He makes explicit in just one sentence two of the controversial tensions of serious gaming: game researchers and educational researchers have different perspectives on how to understand and approach the digital game phenomenon.

As the time of the workshop is extremely brief, its aim is very concrete: to offer a concise introduction to game design. Agenda:

  1. Basic concepts and terminology in game design.
  2. Brief overview of serious games.
  3. Basics of puzzle design.
  4. Put hands on by re-designing a game.
  5. Play test and discuss the results.
(Islas Sedano)
15:30-16:00
Coffee Break
16:00-17:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Basics of Paper Writing and Publishing in TEL - Part 1

The main objective of this workshop is to facilitate students in improving their skills in concisely presenting their research work and outcomes, in exploring publication strategies in TEL, and in identifying the most important landmarks in their PhD fields.

On Monday, in Part 1 of this workshop, we will explore the structure of an academic paper based on some examples. We will commence a mini conference for the week including submission of a small text and peer review. We will also interactively elaborate publication strategies for PhD students in TEL.

On Friday, in Part 2 of this workshop, we will reflect and discuss selected examples from the mini conference. In a further interactive exercise we will have students identify the "landmarks" in their PhD fields.

(Derntl, Kravcik, Klamma)
Parallel Workshop 2
Design, Prototype TEL for culture: Playground

PhD students in the field of TEL, as well as tutors, will have the opportunity to design & prototype their ideas related to the application of technology enhanced learning in museums, working hand in hand with museum educators & curators from the Lisbon NHM.

(Palavitsinis, Manouselis)
Parallel Workshop 3
Let me intervene. Influencing a learning environment through analytics

In today's digital society, there is an increasing capacity to observe users in digital environments. Learning analytics is the area in which the measurement, collection, analysis and report of data about learners and their contexts is used to understand and optimize learning and the environments in which it occurs. Data mining techniques are being used in other areas such as business intelligence, recommender systems or even educational environments. But can these algorithms be applied to real life scenarios? What kind of support can they provide to students and instructors? What is the connection with pedagogy? How should they be adopted by instructors? The answers to these questions provide fertile ground for doctoral research projects. This hands-on workshop starts with an overview of the main research questions emerging in the area of learning analytics followed by an activity in which attendees are exposed to basic data set manipulation techniques and explore how data may guide the design of interventions in a learning experience. For this activity, attendees are required to install the tool RStudio (rstudio.org) in their personal computers. Attendance will be restricted to a maximum of 20 people. http://bit.ly/jtelss-la

(Pardo)
17:30-18:30
PhD Fishbowl - A group discussion in the Fishbowl format between PhD students and advisors
20:30-22:00
Dinner

Tuesday, May 22   

09:00-10:30
Plenary Lectures - Lecture Hall
Computer Supported Hinting Systems and Semantic Web in Education

The main objectives of this lecture are to provide a general understanding of the state of the art about Semantic Web in education and computer supported hinting systems, and to provide a set of useful general research questions for evaluation of hinting systems with their respective statistical methods that should be applied. In this way, it is expected that participants can think about open research topics about Semantic Web in education and computer supported hinting systems, and that participants can apply the statistical methodologies for other research questions in technology enhanced learning. The lecture will include:

  1. An overview of the state of the art about Semantic Web in education
  2. An overview of the state of the art about computer supported hinting systems for learning
  3. A discussion among all the participants about future challenges and open research questions in computer hinting systems as well as Semantic Web in education"
  4. An overview of some usual statistical methodologies applied for the evaluation of computer hinting systems and how and when they can be used
  5. Participants will be asked to determine specific research questions where they can apply these statistical methodologies for experiments in technology enhanced learning.
(Muñoz-Merino)
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
11:00-12:30
Plenary Lectures — Lecture Hall
The Research of Games - Gaming as Research (Mayer)
Emotion and games in technology-enhanced learning (Karpouzis)
12:30-14:00
Lunch
14:00-15:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Roadmapping your PhD

The workshop will build on the modeling activities from last year’s summer school, the results of which have been integrated into the TEL-Map Confolio (http://telmap.confolio.org). The participants will be given their own personal Confolios, where they can describe their research with a mixture of free text and controlled vocabularies. This will allow them to ask machine-processable questions such as e.g., ”Who is working within the same (or similar) sub-areas of TEL as me, but using different theories and/or methods?” Such questions will enable students to find interesting discussion partners and potential co-authors of joint research papers.

After the summer school we will continue these modeling activities within the TEL-Map project (www.telmap.org) via a series of online modeling sessions that will aim at enriching the models in various ways. This will include the creation of an in-TEL-ligence network for collective gathering and assessment of events and developments that influence the future of the TEL community.

In this way the students will have an opportunity to collaboratively build and share the current state of the art in TEL, describe where the innovation points are occurring, and reflect on how their own PhD work fits within this landscape. From a more strategic perspective, being part of such a modeling group will allow the students to position themselves within the TEL community and demonstrate why their research is innovative and where their expertise lies, while at the same time raising their visibility within the TEL-Community as well as in the eyes of the European Commission.

(Naeve, Kamtsiou)
Parallel Workshop 2
Complexity Games (Mayer)
Parallel Workshop 3
How to Build & Develop Responsive Open Learning Environments with the ROLE SDK - Part 1

Widget-based PLE are currently of substantial interest in the TEL community. In such PLEs, teachers and learners combine Web widgets to complete learning applications for their particular learning needs. However, often such PLE are just sets of widgets put side by side lacking technical support for widget integration and learner collaboration.

To address such challenges, ROLE has bundled a set of APIs developed within the project such as learning spaces, inter-widget communication, learner action tracking, etc. into the ROLE Software Development Kit (SDK).

In this hands-on workshop we will introduce, demonstrate and actively work with the ROLE SDK in terms of usage, design, and concrete development. Participants will play with the ROLE Sandbox, an experimental SaaS installation of the SDK, design new/enhance existing widgets with ROLE technologies and learn how to implement their ideas under the guidance of experienced ROLE developers.

The workshop is divided in two parts. The first part consists of a short introduction of about 20 min, a team-up phase and an initial idea storming for new widgets or enhancements of existing widgets using ROLE technologies within the teams. In the second part the teams will compete to develop their ideas under guidance in a code jam.

(Renzel, Kovachev, Klamma)
15:30-16:00
Coffee Break
16:00-17:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Knowledge Maturing – concepts and tools

The workshop will provide a hands-on session on Knowledge Maturing using the open source tools SOBOLEO (social bookmarking, people tagging) and SIMPLE (Social Interactive Mashup PLE). We will also discuss how to design socio-technical systems and how to link it to PhD; i.e. sharing experiences from conducting a PhD in the course of an EU funded project (both presenters are former participants of the JTEL Summer School and conducted their PhD in an EU IP). In Knowlege Cafés, students will collect and discuss new ideas for further development within the open-source community. Students are welcomed to bring in their own tools.

(Weber, Braun)
Parallel Workshop 2
Augmented Reality for Learning Games

Personal mobile devices, such as smartphones or tablets, are now easily found amongst students, but only few of the software applications available for these devices are used in academic and educational settings. Augmented reality technologies provide an innovative tool for the educational mobile environment. Combining real and virtual elements allows us to design digital games for learning and enhance learners’ experiences.

Augmented Reality for Learning Games is a learner-centred workshop that aids participants for the understanding of the role and impact of augmented reality and digital games in education. This workshop provides the following main perspectives:

  1. What are the implications of the game-based AR-learning approach with respect to design requirements that are “unconventional” in comparison to more classic approaches.
  2. What are latest relevant technology trends and innovation in mobile learning that leverage the application in certain domains, for example healthcare, life sciences, language and music learning?
  3. How to design an experiment, using this technology.

Based on these perspectives, the workshop engages participants in the design and development of their own “augmented reality for learning” games, and gives clues on how to best exploit this in experimental scenarios, which are presumably interesting and inspiring for Ph.D. candidates.

(Alvarez, Kelle)
Parallel Workshop 3
How to Build & Develop Responsive Open Learning Environments with the ROLE SDK - Part 2

Widget-based PLE are currently of substantial interest in the TEL community. In such PLEs, teachers and learners combine Web widgets to complete learning applications for their particular learning needs. However, often such PLE are just sets of widgets put side by side lacking technical support for widget integration and learner collaboration.

To address such challenges, ROLE has bundled a set of APIs developed within the project such as learning spaces, inter-widget communication, learner action tracking, etc. into the ROLE Software Development Kit (SDK).

In this hands-on workshop we will introduce, demonstrate and actively work with the ROLE SDK in terms of usage, design, and concrete development. Participants will play with the ROLE Sandbox, an experimental SaaS installation of the SDK, design new/enhance existing widgets with ROLE technologies and learn how to implement their ideas under the guidance of experienced ROLE developers.

The workshop is divided in two parts. The first part consists of a short introduction of about 20 min, a team-up phase and an initial idea storming for new widgets or enhancements of existing widgets using ROLE technologies within the teams. In the second part the teams will compete to develop their ideas under guidance in a code jam.

(Renzel, Kovachev, Klamma)
17:30-18:30
Speed Mentoring - one-on-one groups of PhD holders and seekers, they can discuss for about 10 minutes, then groups/teams are swapped
20:30-22:00
Dinner

Wednesday, Mai 23   

09:00-10:30
Plenary Lectures — Lecture Hall
Design-Based Research in Technology Enhanced Learning (Conole)
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
11:00-12:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Harnessing the power of new media for learning, teaching and research

The workshop will enable participants to explore the characteristics of new social and participatory media and consider how they can be harnessed to support learning, teaching and research. In particular it will look at how research can be promoted through these new technologies. Participants will also get a chance to trial a set of new learning design representations which help designers create more effective and engaging learning opportunities.

(Conole)
Parallel Workshop 2
Research 2.0

This proposal concerns the notion of research2.0 as it applies to TEL. We will briefly present the concept, historical roots, etc and then show some of our tools (TINYARM, MORE!, MUSE, ResearchTable, ...). Participants will then work with the tools, and evaluate how they relate to problems they experience in their research work. We will conclude with a discussion on how TEL research is typically evaluated.

(Duval, Klerkx)
Parallel Workshop 3
Build your Personal Learning Environment

A Personal Learning Environment (PLE) is a novel learning facility that allows learners to aggregate, manipulate and share digital artefacts of their ongoing learning experiences, within a flexible and versatile environment. This workshop will enable students to understand how a PLE can be used to support them in their everyday learning and research tasks. Additionally, the students will have the opportunity to build their own PLE through a set of structured learning activities.

(Mikroyannidis)
12:30-14:00
Lunch
15:00-23:00
Lisbon town (Belém area) ride

Thursday, Mai 24   

09:00-10:30
Plenary Lectures — Lecture Hall
Learning Theory for Mobile Learners in the 21st Century

This lecture is aimed in particular at PhD students studying the use of mobile technologies to support learning however, will be of relevance to those who are working in the wider field of technology enhanced learning. It will provide an overview of the different approaches to learning presented by 20th Century psychologists and relate these to the new contexts and situations presented by the use of mobile technologies for learning. In particular it will introduce constructivist, conversational, collaborative and contextual learning theories and associated motivations to learn prompted by challenge and curiosity. These will be framed within examples of research with UK schoolchildren, students and teachers using handheld mobile phones, Smartphones and PDAs. As a plenary exercise, they srudents will be invited to work in groups to identify the questions that a theory of learning for the 21st Century must address and to debate the extent to which the theories introduced earlier can engage with such questions.

(Wishart)
Social Media and Mobile Technologies in Workplace PracticesGiven the emergent nature of the area, the literature on the use of social media and mobile technologies in workplace practices is small. The following question arises: what, if any, potential is there for the use of social media and mobile technology in informal, professional, work-based learning? Following a 5 minute introduction on the above themes, this lecture will be structured as follows:
  • Participants will be asked to put forward initial ideas on how they would investigate the above question.
  • I will then briefly present my own approach to researching the above question and recount my recent experience of getting a paper about this work reviewed for a journal of international standing. The paper drew on a case study on people tagging in workplace learning.
  • Participants will be invited to critique my approach.
  • I will summarise the lecture interactions, framing them in terms of computer science, natural science and social science research perspectives.
  • The session will conclude by inviting participates to go away and consider the issues surrounding interpretations of what counts as good research from a TEL perspective.
(Cook)
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
11:00-12:30
Plenary Lectures — Lecture Hall
The social experience of TEL: researching neglected social dimensions The "social turn" in studies of learning is widely acknowledged. In this presentation It is argued that guidance on research methods appropriate to social contexts of learning tends to be rather narrowly targeted at conversational exchanges in contained episodes of teaching dialogue orin peer collaboration. However, there are other, neglected occasions of learning that should be included in the "social turn" but for which research methods would be less conventional. Four particular examples will be discussed here.
  • The (expository) voice as social, as found in text and talk.
  • The image as social, as found in publically visible representations of learning.
  • Authentic survey methods for capturing use of social media.
  • The orchestration of socially-structured learning, as captured in self-accounting methods.
Together these examples will be used to illustrate both the range of the "social" in learning and a range of relevant methodologies.
(Crook)
Empathy and Emotions in Intelligent Learning Environments (Paiva)
12:30-14:00
Lunch
14:00-15:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Ethical issues in researching mobile and virtual learning

This discussion based workshop is aimed at PhD students who are about to design or are engaged in designing any data collection that involves personal digital technologies such as mobile phones, podcasting, social networking, virtual worlds and online role-playing games. It will address the ethical concerns that should be considered when any research involves access to personal information that subsumes home and work or school or college contexts, such as that stored on a personal handheld device or in a social networking profile. It will go beyond the research associations' published codes of conduct to address questions such as what do privacy, image and consent now mean to participants, whether in their virtual life or in the real world and how should a researcher respect it. Issues such as the ease with which photographs can be captured, transferred and transformed and who owns them where will also be debated.

(Wishart)
Parallel Workshop 2
Webquest 2.0 training scenarios: Connecting TEL research to workplace

Bridging the gap between TEL research and workplace practices is a big challenge for researchers, trainers and professionals especially nowadays. The focus of this workshop is to invite phd TEL students to design WebQuest 2.0 training scenarios in order to promote TEL practices in a workplace context. Participants will be first introduced to a practical example of a phd research innovation that was successfully transferred to workplace. More specifically the Collaborative Blended Learning Model and WebQuests 2.0 activities that have been tried before only in Foreign Language Learning sector were transferred through the European project Webquest for HRM to the field of Professional Development in SMEs (15min). The workshop will continue with a discussion related to the ways that TEL research can be linked to workplace (10min).

Students will work in groups to design WebQuest 2.0 scenarios based on their TEL research experience that will aim to transfer TEL knowledge to professionals in an authentic way (50min). In the end, the session will be concluded with a series of recordings in which students will briefly describe their innovative ideas and evaluate their learning experience (15min).

Students are invited to bring their laptops.

(Perifanou)
Parallel Workshop 3
Personalised Support for Self-Regulated Learning - Part 1

The objective is to demonstrate the conceptual and technical solutions for personalized support of self-regulated learning (SRL). Specific strategies for SRL will be explained and used to design a Personal Learning Environment (PLE). The workshop consists of three parts:

  1. Theoretical Introduction: Illustrative example, SRL principles, metrics for success, barriers for user adoption.
  2. Interactive Part: Choose a learning objective, design PLE and create innovative SRL strategies.
  3. Plenary Discussion: Presentation of results, lessons learned, SRL barriers and advantages.
(Nussbaumer, Kravcik, Klamma)
15:30-16:00
Coffee Break
16:00-17:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning

One of the challenges in designing for TEL is working with different stakeholders towards a common goal. The Design-Based Research (DBR) approach attempts to meet this challenge by including iterations of design, implementation and evaluation in learning and teaching practice. The aim of the workshop is to use multidiscipline perspectives of computer science (CS), interaction design (ID), education and didactics (ED) to explore the complex issues of supporting TEL. The workshop aims at envisioning future learning scenarios that add value to the practice of education by examining the current state-of-the-art learning tools (e.g. Adobe Connect and Moodle).

The workshop has three main parts. The first part is an introduction (20 mins), the second part (35 mins) will have the participants break into three groups to discuss the three perspectives (CS, ID, and ED). Each group will explore the different learning tools related to a scenario of current practice, preparing key discussion points. For the third part (35 mins) the three groups will reconvene to present their group work followed by a general discussion about how to bridge the intellectual distance for TEL from the perspectives of CS, ID and ED.

(Eliasson)
Parallel Workshop 2
Visualization in TEL (Duval, Klerkx, Verbert)
Parallel Workshop 3
Personalised Support for Self-Regulated Learning - Part 2

The objective is to demonstrate the conceptual and technical solutions for personalized support of self-regulated learning (SRL). Specific strategies for SRL will be explained and used to design a Personal Learning Environment (PLE). The workshop consists of three parts:

  1. Theoretical Introduction: Illustrative example, SRL principles, metrics for success, barriers for user adoption.
  2. Interactive Part: Choose a learning objective, design PLE and create innovative SRL strategies.
  3. Plenary Discussion: Presentation of results, lessons learned, SRL barriers and advantages.
(Nussbaumer, Kravcik, Klamma)
17:30-18:30
After PhD - Discuss with PhD holders and people from industry what alternative there are after finishing the PhD
Presentation SkillsOnly a few people are talented in the art of public speaking. Many others suffer during presentations and desire to finish them quickly. Here we are going to talk about reasons for stage-fright. We present and train skills that help to appear confident for the public during your speech. Moreover, we give some advices how to stay cool on public.(Kensche)
20:30-22:00
Dinner

Friday, Mai 25   

09:00-10:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Using Reference Managers to Support Academic Works

The natural response to ever-increasing volume of resources included in research and academic work is to use personal, bibliographic software. These tools can create bibliography and footnotes in combination with popular word processing programs. They also allow direct searching in some data bases and sharing of bibliographic files among research colleagues. The aim of this workshop is to present a practical and personal approach in the use of popular reference managers to facilitate the gathering, organization, systematization, and integration of the bibliographic references in the Academic documents.

(Alves Lopes)
Parallel Workshop 2
Basics of Paper Writing and Publishing in TEL - Part 2

The main objective of this workshop is to facilitate students in improving their skills in concisely presenting their research work and outcomes, in exploring publication strategies in TEL, and in identifying the most important landmarks in their PhD fields.

On Monday, in Part 1 of this workshop, we will explore the structure of an academic paper based on some examples. We will commence a mini conference for the week including submission of a small text and peer review. We will also interactively elaborate publication strategies for PhD students in TEL.

On Friday, in Part 2 of this workshop, we will reflect and discuss selected examples from the mini conference. In a further interactive exercise we will have students identify the "landmarks" in their PhD fields.

(Derntl, Kravcik, Klamma)
Parallel Workshop 3
A Web 2.0 Application for Construction of Digital Contents

This workshop will actively involve participants in exploring a Web 2.0 application as tools for creating digital content to put on a learning platform. The Web 2.0 applications, such as Wix, allow you to build interactive digital content without any programming knowledge. The purpose of the workshop focuses on sharing with participants the possibilities offered by web 2.0 tools in education where the user is a no longer just consumer of content by also contributing to the collective knowledge. Participants will be given a practical demonstration of how to creat a digital content made in WIX and embed the content in a Moodle (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) course. Afther the practical demonstration participants will have a hands-on opportunity to work with the tools and actually begin creating their own digital contents and share them in the Moodle course.

(Novo, Torres, Pacheco, Galego)
10:30-11:00
Coffee Break
11:00-12:30
Parallel Workshop 1
Industrial Session

The web is the primary mean of communication in developed societies. All kinds of information that describe our recent times are published on the web. As everyone can publish online, it becomes possible to analyze events through various first-person points of view that provide different perspectives, and not just the official descriptions issued by dominant forces. Thus, the web is a valuable resource for contemporary historical research. However, its information is extremely ephemeral.

Several research studies have shown that only a small amount of information remains available on the web for longer than 1 year. Web archiving aims to acquire, preserve and provide access to historical information published on the web. In November 2011, there were 52 web archiving initiatives worldwide, which include services that enable any person to create their own historical collections. Web archiving has also an important sociological impact because common citizens are publishing information with a personal meaning on the web, without having any preservation concerns, such as saving their pictures on a disk. In the future, web archives will be the only source of personal memories to many people.

There are tools, such as browser add-ons, that facilitate historical research over web archives. However, most of them require that the users know the exact address (URL) where the needed information was published in the past. The Portuguese Web Archive provides a full-text search service over 1 billion contents archived from 1996 to 2011 (available at www.archive.pt), as well as other tools for historical research over archived web collections. More info: http://bit.ly/KcAbmO

(Almada, Gomes, Sequeira)
Parallel Workshop 2
Ground-breaking fresh ideas – IJTEL journal

The International Journal of Technology-Enhanced Learning values young researchers. Therefore, the editor in chief Ambjörn Naeve and his managing editor Fridolin Wild are (again) inviting participants of the summer school to step up, take ownership, and organise a special issue dedicated to (and organised by) next generation researchers. With the first young researcher special issue published and the second one in pipeline, within this workshop, the editors will seek contact to willing individuals that want to do a kind of journal editor internship. This workshop session / kick-off meeting should run in parallel to others (as it should be limited to a small 5-10 people strong group). Depending on attendance, guest editors of the two previous special issues will be included in organising this session.

(Wild, Scott, Naeve, Reinhard)
Parallel Workshop 3
Designing your Educational Web Apps

In this workshop, we will consider the deconstruction of traditional learning environments and the elicitation of user requirements to design innovative and targeted Web Apps that can be later integrated in Personal Learning Environments or in LMS (using ad-hoc plugins). Approaches to enforce user experience, to provide scaffolding, and to enable interoperability using ROLE technology will be discussed. The participants will work with the ROLE requirement bazar, the ROLE widget store and the Graasp PLE enabler. Participants will interact in interdisciplinary design teams integrating competencies in education and information technology. Graasp space: http://graasp.epfl.ch/#item=space_1812

(Bogdanov, Na, Gillet)
12:30-14:00
Lunch
14:00-16:00
Closing / Wrap Up
School evaluation
Wrap up and good bye
16:30-20:30
Free Time / Student Activities
20:30-22:00
Dinner

Saturday, Mai 26   

Full day
TBA

Venue Description

The Summer School will take place in Estoril, Portugal. Situated on the coast, half-hour by train from Lisbon, Estoril has a wonderful climate and a superb natural environment, known as the Portuguese Riviera. The richness of the heritage of Estoril Coast, reflects its Royal historic past. To walk around the region is to have the sensation of living in another time, to belong in another world. The Estoril Coast also knows how to adapt itself to the present, incorporating its “glamour”, delicacy, and royalty into a wide range of environments and activities. Surfers will find the best waves at Carcavelos Beach and Guincho Beach is very popular for wind and kite surfing. Nowhere else in the world can such changes of scenery and such contrasting atmospheres be experienced in such a small area as the Estoril Coast. The region offers a concentration of different experiences.

Photos


Accomodation and Social Events


Accommodation and summer school facilities will be made available at Hotel Vila Galé Estoril, (http://www.vilagale.pt/pages/hoteis/?hotel=12) located right along Estoril Coast, two minutes away from the sea and overlooking the  charming Tamariz Beach. PhD students are asked to share double rooms with other PhD students.

Guidelines For Participants

Cost of Summer School

The cost for PhD students is Euro 570 (including accommodation - 7 nights in double rooms, meals and excursions,).  JTEL has secured funding to provide funding for about 40 PhD student grants to cover summer school  accommodation, catering, and events. Please indicate if you are applying for a scholarship in your application.

Social Groups

Join the JTEL 2012 group on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/groups/jtel2012/

Summer School social group: http://teleurope.eu/jtelss12

Organising Committee

Programme Chairs:

Milos Kravcik

Martin Wolpers

Jocelyn Wishart

Igor Mayer


Lecture Chairs:

Nikos Manouselis

Marie Joubert


Local Organisation Chair:

Ana Torres


Student Organisation Chairs:

Ana Loureiro

Antigoni Parmaxi

Nikos Palavitsinis


Activity Chairs:

Maren Sheffel

Muesser Cemal Nat


PhD Advisory Chair:

Ralf Klamma


Publicity Chairs:

Marcela Morales

Ana Loureiro


Journal Chairs:

Wolfgang Reinhart

Ambjorn Naeve


Admissions Chairs:

Tomaz Klobucar

Katherine Maillet


Finance Chair:

Fridolin Wild


Website:

Anna Hannemann


Steering Committee:

Katherine Maillet

Ralf Klamma

Tomaz Klobucar

Denis Gillet



Programme Committee:

Mohamed-Amine Chatti, Informatik 9 (eLearning) - RWTH Aachen University
Paul De Bra, TU/e
Micheal Derntl, RWTH Aachen University
Erik Duval, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Hannes Ebner, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
Sandy Elhelou, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Denis Gillet, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Neuza-Sofia Guerreiro-Pedro, Universidade de Lisboa
Marie Joubert, University of Bristol
Barbara Kieslinger, Centre for Social Innovation
Ralf Klamma, RWTH Aachen University
Joris Klerkx, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Tomaz Klobucar, Jozef Stefan Institute
Milos Kravcik, RWTH Aachen University
Barbara Kump, Knowledge Management Institute, TU Graz
Gavrilut Laura, AgroKnow
Tobias Ley, Tallinn University
Ana Loureiro, Polytechnic Institute of Santarém
Katherine Maillet, Institut Mines-Telecom, Telecom Ecole de Management
Nikos Manouselis, Greek Research & Technology Network
Marcela Morales, Institut Mines-Telecom, Telecom Ecole de Management
Jad Najjar, Eummena & AL-Quds
Nikos Palavitsinis, Greek Research & Technology Network
Antigoni Parmaxi, Cyprus University of Technology
Matti Pauna, University of Helsinki
Maria Perifanou, University of Athens
Zinayida Petrushyna, RWTH Aachen University
Traian Rebedea, “Politehnica” University of Bucharest
Joze Rugelj, University of Ljubljana
Andreas Schmidt, Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences
Birgit Schmitz, Open University of the Netherlands
Martin Sillaots, Tallinn University Centre for Educational Technology
Marcus Specht, Open University of the Netherlands
Stefaan Ternier, Open University of the Netherlands
Ana Torres, Polytechnic Institute of Santarém
Riina Vuorikari, Open University of the Netherlands
Fridolin Wild, The Open University
Martin Wolpers, Fraunhofer Institute of Applied Information Technology

Call for Lectures and Workshops



If you would like to offer a lecture or workshop at the summer school we invite you to submit a short abstract (max 250 words) describing your contribution, which should demonstrate how your presentation will benefit the PhD candidates attending the summer school (mainly early to mid-stage). We encourage interactive sessions rather than lecture-style presentations, and your abstract could include details about how you plan to engage the PhD candidates. Lectures are usually no longer than 45 minutes and workshops are usually 90 minutes. Some workshops run 2 x 90 minutes. Lectures should provide students with insight into the state-of-the-art in one aspect of TEL or methodologies for conducting research in TEL. Workshops should provide hands-on opportunities to work with new technologies or develop research techniques.

Please submit your proposal to Easy Chair: JTEL2012 EasyChair. Be sure to tick the correct box: lecture or workshop proposal.

PhD students applying to participate in the summer school are also invited to propose workshops.

If your preliminary proposal is selected, you will be requested to provide a full proposal on EasyChair (i.e. an extended abstract and a detailed planning of activities with the PhD candidates). Please note that speakers and workshop organizers are expected to cover the costs of their trip and accommodation (typically through the TEL projects they are belonging to).

This year, as scientific output of the summer school, we will publish the collection of the extended abstracts for presentations and workshops. We will provide further guidance concerning these extended abstracts but the idea is that they should emphasise the current challenges you are tackling and how they relate to the state-of-the-art in your area.